Posts Tagged ‘rehabilitation’

Dear followers and friends,

We thank you for your dedication in staying updated with Talib’s blog and story.  Right now our family is readying to attend a quarterly meeting of the U.S. Parole Commission.  At this upcoming meeting we plan to raise our concerns about Talib’s case, his recent denial of parole and set off of 5 years.  In anticipation of this important meeting, we have been gathering our resources, pulling together letters and people who plan to attend by our side to voice their support for Talib.  You too can play a role and help Talib’s voice be heard and our concerns listened to.  Sign our petition to show your support for the U.S. Parole Commission to reconsider their denial of parole to Talib M. shakir.

Here are the details:

http://www.change.org/petitions/u-s-parole-commission-reconsider-the-recent-parole-decision-for-talib-m-shakir

Here’s why it’s important:

We, the undersigned, call on Mr. Isaac Fulwood, Jr., Chairman, U.S. Parole Commission to reconsider Talib Mustafa Shakir for immediate parole. Talib has grown from a confused, misguided youth into a focused, mature adult. He has been a positive influence among those around him, as was displayed in the show of support by the deputy warden, and we are confident that he will continue to display this outstanding character upon release into society.

Talib M. Shakir has served 20 years in federal prison for an unfortunate crime he committed at the young age of 17.  Having immediate remorse for this crime, Talib has been on a path to change his life around for the better ever since.  He has made remarkable achievements while incarcerated, including receiving his G.E.D., barber’s liscense, physical training liscense, and making strides toward a Masters Certificate in Life Coaching.  He has enrolled in numerous college courses as well as facilitated several Victim Impact courses and workshops.  His role as a mentor and life coach has touched the lives of countless youth, inmates, and ex-offenders, many who now lead successful lives on the outside.

We who await Talib’s release from prison have felt firsthand his personal contributions to society and ability to improve lives.  We recognize his high potential for full rehabilitation and fully support his chance at release on parole.  We know and trust that his skills, dedication, and compassion will lead him to continue his positive work here on the outside, where he can be surrounded and supported by his family and friends who miss him dearly.

We ask the U.S. Parole Commission to reconsider their denial of parole atTalib’s July, 2013 parole hearing.  We ask them to go with the recommendation of the hearing examiner, who recommended him for a release date of March, 2014.

You can sign our petition by clicking here.

Thank you for your support!

The family and loved ones of Talib

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The following is a reflection paper from the Inside-Out Course titled The Offender and Re-entry.  Inside-Out classes are college courses taught at nearby federal prisons.  The classes offer college students and inmates a chance to learn together and from each other in a shared learning environment.  

When it comes to the label of being an ex-offender, I have mixed emotions about that word. I am aware that everybody will have his or her own interpretation of that word, and that interpretation will be the criteria that is used to judge the ex-offender. Yet that label is actually less harsh than having to be described by the nature of ones offense. To me, having to wear that label would be harsh and burdensome. Why is that? It goes back to the double consciousness that was spoken about in class awhile ago. It is easier to say that I have been to prison that it is to say what I have been to prison for. It is always that double consciousness that no matter what there is still that sense of guilt of knowing that someone has been harmed by your actions. As Michelle Alexander speaks about the Cruel Hand and what it means to be an ex-offender is society today, it is equally important to note what it means to have to live with the memories of one’s actions and behaviors.

I have many friends that have left prison and have never returned as they were determined to succeed and not let the “ex-offender” label hold them back. In fact none of my close friends have come back to prison. One thing that we had in common was we understood the importance of education. We had dreams, plans to succeed and were determined to not let the experience of prison dictate what we had planned for our futures.

They have managed to overcome the things that Michelle Alexander attributes to the cause of recidivism. Yet there is something deeper that people who have committed crimes suffer from and that is the guilt that they carry with them day in and day out as the try and come to terms with the things that they have done in life. There are certain realities expected when it comes to what one has to deal with after leaving prison. Unfortunately, there are very few programs in place to prepare the ex-offender for the mental effects that they have and will suffer from as they continue their journey through life. Not dealing with these issues can be the fuse, that if it is never extinguished, can lead one back to prison. As one talks about recidivism, one has to wonder about the mental state of some of the individuals that return to prison.

It has to be assumed that there may be a sense of hopelessness out in the free world, which in turn gives a person a sense of belonging in these institutions. If one does not learn to deal with the guilt and shame that he or she may carry, it could lead to low self esteem, which can lead to carelessness and reckless behavior.  If the general opinion is that, once a person has been incarcerated, there is little hope for him or her, and this person constantly hears this at some point they begin to believe it, what else is expected from them other than to live a life where they are accepted, regardless of the acts, no matter how heinous they may be?

There are many people in prison because they feel this is where they belong. They have status, friends, and are accepted the way that they are. There is no pressure to be anything other that what they think they are. For the person that suffers from this, and there are many, it proves the point that there is some mental defects in the way that this person thinks. This idea has always stuck with me after a conversation that I had with another inmate years ago.  One day he tells me, “Talib I never have to go home again and I am cool. I can rob guys here (that was his criminal profession), I can get high, and they have punks (homosexuals) here that look like chicks.  So for real I am cool. ”  He led a life in prison that reflected this mindset and was murdered the first week that he was home, because of his actions in prison.  He never made it out of the halfway house.

The guy that I just spoke about had a history of recidivism and the day that he told me how he felt about prison it became clear that he was crazy.  Therefore, I have to ask myself how many other people suffer from this mindset.  What Michelle Alexander mentions concerning the stigma that the ex-offender has to deal with is so true, but there are other deeply embedded psychological issues that most convicted felons suffer from that contributes to the steadily increasing rate of recidivism.

To me, it is frightening to know there are some people who think that they belong behind bars, and that they are not even willing to break the cycle of recidivism. What is more frightening is someone close to them planted this idea/seed in their head to make them believe this to be true. That someone may have made them feel that prison was and is the place that they belong. As solutions are sought to address this issue of recidivism, one must not rule out addressing mental health issues. More often than not, a mental issue is contributing to the steady rise of incarceration and not outright criminality.